rashaka:

hockpock:

qualiachameleon:

rocketumbl:

Theo Jansen  Strandbeest

Side note: These don’t have motors. They’re completely momentum/wind-powered and literally just wander around beaches unsupervised like giant abstract monsters.

these are both amazing and COMPLETELY TERRIFYING

i’m unreasonably freaked out and disturbed by these

(via stankface)

Tags: omg art

cinematicnomad:

apparently e.l. james called former child star mara wilson (matilda) a “sad fuck” for critiquing the 50shades books a while ago and now there’s a feud. i love it.

(via watsonette)

strikerhercules:

» Because only Vin Diesel could ever be ridiculously nerdy enough to attend the UK world premiere red carpet for Guardians of the Galaxy wearing a “I am Groot” t-shirt and walking on stilts

(via larnbean)

ostracizedpoodle:

I don’t need alcohol to make bad decisions

(via dutchster)

doubleleaf:

I understand now, Marvel is doing something very interesting xD

doubleleaf:

I understand now, Marvel is doing something very interesting xD

(via angelgazing)

sketchlock:

kowabungadoodles:

pingass:

laubhaufen:

monkeyscandance:

speakslittle:

ashlee-ketchum:

abakkus:

fishwifemcguinn:

hilarydesign:

kurokotetsuya:

same

same

Pretty much

2003:

image

2014:

image

just fucking draw. don’t compare yourself to other people, don’t stop because you drew a lot last tuesday and you haven’t visibly improved. it takes time, effort, and a lot of perseverance. besides, no matter how “bad” you think you are, there’s still gonna be someone who thinks the stuff you produce is the best goddamn thing they’ve ever seen in their entire life. the artist you were five years ago would have their mind fucking blown by the artist you are today. so just draw a fuckton, because every new thing you draw is one drawing better than you were before.

I really needed this post

2003:

Trying my hand at shoujo always ended in a hilarious disaster.

2014:

Jumping on this post as well, because it is important to remember this at times.

2003:

2014:

13 year old me would be stoked to see where I am now. It’s really good to look back sometimes and appreciate how far you’ve come. And then imagine how much further you can go when you keep drawing.

2001:

2014: 

Even though I want to laugh my head off at my old stuff… it really is important to look at how far you’ve come in time.
And I think it’s not only good for yourself but for young artists / beginners as well, to see how other artists started out. So they see that no one is a great artist right off the bat.

2007:

2014:

It has already been eight years wow man.

This post gives me so much strength, i love to see everyone’s progress please do it too…

image

2014:

image

I’m a total sucker for progression things ahh

I remember that it took me several hours to get what I got in 2007 while I literally just speedpainted the one on the right in maybe 16-30 minutes (I forgot to time). But yes, ALWAYS REMEMBER, YOU GET BETTER. 

demons:

Marguerite Higgins (Sept 3 1920 - Jan 3 1966) was an American reporter and renown war correspondent who covered the Second World War, the Korean War and the war in Vietnam. She attended the University of California and Berkely, where in 1941 she graduated with a B.A. degree in French and received a Masters degree in journalism from Columbia University. Well ahead of her time, Higgins worked for the New York Herald Tribune for two years before finally persuading them to allow her to become a war correspondent in 1944. After that, she was in London and Paris before being reassigned to Germany in March 1945. It was there she witnessed the liberation of the Dachau concentration camp in April of that year and received the US Army campaign ribbon for her assistance of capturing and arresting SS guards. In the immediate post-war Germany, Higgins covered the Nuremberg trials and then the Soviet Union’s blockade of Berlin. In 1950, when the Korean War broke out, she was the first war correspondent in the country. Despite her resume and experience from the Second World War, Higgins was ordered out of the country by General Walton Walker, who argued that “women did not belong at the front” and that “the military had no time to worry about making separate accommodations for them”.  Seeing no other option, Higgins made a personal appeal to General Walker’s superior officer, General Douglas MacArthur. MacArthur subsequently sent a telegram to the New York Herald Tribune that read:

Ban on women correspondents in Korea has been lifted. Marguerite Higgins is held in highest professional esteem by everyone.

As a result, Higgins work during the Korean War was some of the best seen in war journalism. So much so that her work won her the Pulitzer Prize in 1951 for international reporting, making her the first woman to do so. She shared the award with five previous male correspondents. In the 1960s, after covering the Vietnam War for several years, she contracted the tropical disease known as leishmaniasis. Marguerite died at the age of 45 in January 1966.

demons:

Marguerite Higgins (Sept 3 1920 - Jan 3 1966) was an American reporter and renown war correspondent who covered the Second World War, the Korean War and the war in Vietnam. She attended the University of California and Berkely, where in 1941 she graduated with a B.A. degree in French and received a Masters degree in journalism from Columbia University.

Well ahead of her time, Higgins worked for the New York Herald Tribune for two years before finally persuading them to allow her to become a war correspondent in 1944. After that, she was in London and Paris before being reassigned to Germany in March 1945. It was there she witnessed the liberation of the Dachau concentration camp in April of that year and received the US Army campaign ribbon for her assistance of capturing and arresting SS guards. In the immediate post-war Germany, Higgins covered the Nuremberg trials and then the Soviet Union’s blockade of Berlin.

In 1950, when the Korean War broke out, she was the first war correspondent in the country. Despite her resume and experience from the Second World War, Higgins was ordered out of the country by General Walton Walker, who argued that “women did not belong at the front” and that “the military had no time to worry about making separate accommodations for them”.

Seeing no other option, Higgins made a personal appeal to General Walker’s superior officer, General Douglas MacArthur. MacArthur subsequently sent a telegram to the New York Herald Tribune that read:

Ban on women correspondents in Korea has been lifted. Marguerite Higgins is held in highest professional esteem by everyone.

As a result, Higgins work during the Korean War was some of the best seen in war journalism. So much so that her work won her the Pulitzer Prize in 1951 for international reporting, making her the first woman to do so. She shared the award with five previous male correspondents.

In the 1960s, after covering the Vietnam War for several years, she contracted the tropical disease known as leishmaniasis. Marguerite died at the age of 45 in January 1966.

(via sanguinarysanguinity)

"The Princess is everything Luke wants to be. She is socially conscious, whereas he is thrown into things; intellectually, she is a strong leader, and he is just a kid."

- George Lucas

People often talk about how Han influenced Luke, but we should also look at how Leia influenced Luke.

(via apolla-savre)

I’ve always really liked this idea—that they’re the exact same age, but their different lives have given them very different levels of maturity, and Luke is envious, but fascinated, and idolizes her a bit.

(via another-skywalker)

It’s kind of weird to think of Han as being a big influence compared to Leia.  I mean, yes, they were close.  But it’s made reasonably obvious that close male friends aren’t something Luke’s ever lacked.  If anything, I’d say they’re mutually influential.  Han’s experience and training help temper Luke’s youth and inexperience, and his cynicism demands that Luke account for his own faith. Luke, in turn, cracks Han’s shell with hope and faith, and his earnest belief that Han can be better than what he’s let himself become won’t let him crawl back into the hole he’s dug for himself.

But Leia?

I mean, come on.  Luke’s got these vague intentions to run away and do…something.  He’s dissatisfied with his home life, he’s dissatisfied with the future he sees for himself, and he resents, in an equally vague way, the expectations of his family.  He thinks of joining the rebellion because he’s romanticized it.   He thinks of going to the academy because it’s anywhere but where he’s at.  All of his ambitions amount to this sort of nebulous, Anything But What I Have aspiration.  He goes running after Kenobi on the strength of a shitty, recorded hologram because it seems exciting.  He has no real idea about what this sort of mission would entail, or cost, or achieve.  It’s an Adventure, and he’s bored.

Then he meets Leia, and she’s literally everything he ever had some mindless daydream about being.  Only instead of being a cardboard cut-out hero in some story he’s using to distract himself from a shitty frontier subsistence-farmer life, she’s a real person who’s actually fucking doing it.  She’s a leader.  She’s a fighter.  She’s risking life and limb for a cause she completely and utterly understands and absolutely believes in.  This isn’t some thing she ran away to do because she got sick of being a princess and a senator.  People look up to her, and follow her, and obey her, because she’s spent her life earning it.

He’s looking around and going “Empire bad?  We blow up ships?” and she’s going “Here’s ten political treatises on why the Empire needs to go, here are the details of troop movements and expected reinforcements and supply lines for the upcoming battle, and here are the family photos of everybody in the next ten systems that are going to get stomped into bloody paste in retaliation if we fail here.” He finds her, and within five minutes she’s gone from the princess he’s rescuing because that’s what action heroes do to the person he needs to emulate if he’s ever going to make something of himself.

(via theharlequinrose)

(via sanguinarysanguinity)

sugarbooty:

hikergirl:

Here is the link to the City Lab article and the link to the actual website, Turn On Detroit’s Water.
h/t to amomenttothink for retweeting this.

Earlier I posted a different link to a site that is trying to do this same work, and so far I haven’t had any luck with getting a response from them, but I understand they have been inundated with requests from people and there are only a couple of people singlehandedly running that site. Anyways, here is another site that might get your money to where it needs to go faster! I feel like it’s safe to say that it doesn’t matter which channel you go through to help the people in need, as long as the organization is legit.

sugarbooty:

hikergirl:

Here is the link to the City Lab article and the link to the actual website, Turn On Detroit’s Water.

h/t to amomenttothink for retweeting this.

Earlier I posted a different link to a site that is trying to do this same work, and so far I haven’t had any luck with getting a response from them, but I understand they have been inundated with requests from people and there are only a couple of people singlehandedly running that site. Anyways, here is another site that might get your money to where it needs to go faster! I feel like it’s safe to say that it doesn’t matter which channel you go through to help the people in need, as long as the organization is legit.

(via amindamazed)

(Source: marvelparksdept, via essouffle)

charminglyantiquated:

a little love story about mermaids and tattoos

(via elesteria)

dysfunctionalqueer:

proudly-pro-choice:

shootinthebulltx:

Over 1 millions children are killed every year in elective abortions, almost 50,000 of them after 16 weeks. Now let’s talk about how to best save their lives. #abortion #forthechildrenhttp://click-to-read-mo.re/p/7zhv/536a421d

I really just love pro-life logic.
Why help those who have been born when we can stick our noses into other people’s private health care matters? Lets try to get them to keep their pregnancies! We can go back to ignoring them after they give birth.
Yeah, makes total sense, right?

You want to save children?
How about we start with the 397,000 in foster care in the U.S. and give them loving, permanent homes? x
Or the 1.5 million homeless children in america? X
Or the 16.2 million children who are going hungry in america? X
Or the 18,900,000 children who are refuges, running from violence in their homelands? X
Or the 6 million children in the U.S. alone who are abused each year? X
Or the 1.2 million children who are trafficked, sold as slaves, usually sexual slaves, each year? X
Oh, no, let’s start with the non-sentient fetuses that can’t feel pain, or know what’s going on. 
Let’s ignore these millions and millions of living, breathing children who are living through hell right now. 

dysfunctionalqueer:

proudly-pro-choice:

shootinthebulltx:

Over 1 millions children are killed every year in elective abortions, almost 50,000 of them after 16 weeks. Now let’s talk about how to best save their lives. #abortion #forthechildren

http://click-to-read-mo.re/p/7zhv/536a421d

I really just love pro-life logic.

Why help those who have been born when we can stick our noses into other people’s private health care matters? Lets try to get them to keep their pregnancies! We can go back to ignoring them after they give birth.

Yeah, makes total sense, right?

You want to save children?

How about we start with the 397,000 in foster care in the U.S. and give them loving, permanent homes? x

Or the 1.5 million homeless children in america? X

Or the 16.2 million children who are going hungry in america? X

Or the 18,900,000 children who are refuges, running from violence in their homelands? X

Or the 6 million children in the U.S. alone who are abused each year? X

Or the 1.2 million children who are trafficked, sold as slaves, usually sexual slaves, each year? X

Oh, no, let’s start with the non-sentient fetuses that can’t feel pain, or know what’s going on. 

Let’s ignore these millions and millions of living, breathing children who are living through hell right now. 

(via acceber74)

labrujamorgan:

Ugh elementary why
This whole uncritical acceptance of the “demographics unit” is really ruining my vibe.

I think they were going for a subtle shade of gray thing, add a little hint of unseemly to go along with the Bell-being-in-a-soulless-desk-job plot, a tiny bit of grit. But to just throw that in there with no real commentary and no importance to the plot came off really weird. Also unsatisfying and thoughtless of the writers.

Tags: elementary

blackchildrensbooksandauthors:

Born on this day…July 16, 1862

Ida B. Wells: Journalist, Newspaper Editor, Anti-Lynching Activist

Book:

Crusade for Justice: The Autobiography of Ida B. Wells

Ida B. Wells was one of the foremost crusaders against black oppression. This engaging memoir tells of her private life as mother of a growing family as well as her public activities as teacher, lecturer, and journalist in her fight against attitudes and laws oppressing blacks.

Quotes from Ida B. Wells:

“The people must know before they can act, and there is no educator to compare with the press.”

“I had an instinctive feeling that the people who have little or no intelligence or no school training should have something coming into their homes weekly which dealt with their problems in a simple, helpful way…so I wrote in a plain, common-sense way on the things that concerned our people.”

“The mob spirit has grown with the increasing intelligence of the Afro-American.”

“The city of Memphis has demonstrated that neither character nor standing avails the Negro if he dares to protect himself against the white man or become his rival.”

“The nineteenth century lynching mob cuts off ears, toes, and fingers, strips off flesh, and distributes portions of the body as souvenirs among the crowd.”

“The white man’s victory soon became complete by fraud, violence, intimidation and murder.”

“If it were possible, I would gather the race in my arms and fly away with them.”

(via stankface)

america-wakiewakie:

Here’s How The U.S. Sparked A Refugee Crisis On The Border, In 8 Simple Steps | Huffington Post
The 57,000 children from Central America who have streamed across the U.S.-Mexico border this year were driven in large part by the United States itself. While Democrats and Republicans have been pointing fingers at each other, in reality the current wave of migration from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras has its roots in six decades of U.S. policies carried out by members of both parties.
Since the 1950s, the U.S. has sown violence and instability in Central America. Decades of Cold War gamesmanship, together with the relentless global war on drugs, have left a legacy of chaos and brutality in these countries. In many parts of the region, civil society has given way to lawlessness. It’s these conditions the children are escaping.
1) 1954: US Overthrows Arbenz
The story of the U.S.-led destabilization of Central America began in 1954, with the overthrow of the elected Guatemalan government of President Jacobo Arbenz. A populist leader inspired by President Franklin Roosevelt’s “New Deal,” Arbenz had plans for an ambitious land redistribution program that aimed to help a nation composed largely of landless farmers. But those plans butted against the interests of the United Fruit Company, a U.S. corporation that owned much of Guatemala’s arable land, along with railroad infrastructure and a port. The CIA helped engineer the overthrow of the Arbenz government, laying the foundation for decades of government instability and, eventually, a civil war that would claim more than 200,000 lives by the 1980s. That war wasn’t fully resolved until the 1990s. “Our involvement in Central America has not been a very positive one over the last 60 years,” Rep. Beto O’Rourke, a Democrat from El Paso, Texas, told The Huffington Post. “You can go back to the coup that overthrew Jacobo Arbenz in 1954, fully backed by the Eisenhower administration and the Dulles brothers, who had an interest in the United Fruit company, whose fight with the government really precipitated the crisis that led to the coup.” It set a pattern. “You look at the decades following that, and the military strongmen, and the juntas, and the mass killings, and it’s no wonder Guatemala is in such terrible shape today,” O’Rourke said.
2) U.S. Fuels Civil Wars
Along with the decades-long war against leftists in Guatemala, the U.S. organized and funded El Salvador’s protracted war with the FMLN, a left-wing guerrilla movement. The U.S. also funded counterinsurgency efforts in Honduras, which became a staging ground for the Contras. Death squads flourished, more than75,000 people died and civil society collapsed. If today’s crisis were simply a result of Central American confusion about the president’s policy regarding immigrant children, as is widely alleged, one might expect children to be coming in equal numbers from every Central American country. But notably, Nicaragua — a country that borders Honduras, and one in which the U.S. failed to keep a far-left government from coming to power — is today relatively stable and not a source of rampant migration. It is led by President Daniel Ortega, whose Sandinista movement took power in 1979 and held off the U.S.-backed Contras until an opposition government was elected in 1990. "You see the direct effects of these Cold War policies," Greg Grandin, a professor of Latin American history at New York University, told The Huffington Post. "Nicaragua doesn’t really have a gang problem, and researchers have traced this back to the 1980s and U.S. Cold War policy." 
3) Refugees Flee Central America For The U.S.
With wars come refugees. The young people who streamed into the United States from Central America in the late ’70s and ’80s had deep experience with violence. When Alex Sanchez, the executive director of Homies Unidos in Los Angeles, made his first journey from El Salvador to the United States in 1979, he was only 7 years old. Like many of the 57,000 children stopped at the U.S.-Mexico border in 2014 — most of them from Central America — Sanchez came to the U.S. searching for his parents, who had immigrated to Los Angeles five years before. When the adults he was traveling with handed him and his 5-year-old brother to their parents in L.A., Sanchez no longer recognized them. “All I had was a black-and-white picture of my mother from when she was 16,” Sanchez told The Huffington Post. “These two people were complete strangers to us now. We didn’t know them anymore. We thought initially that we had been sold, given to strangers — we didn’t know what to make of it.”
4) The U.S. Launches The Drug War As Cities Are Hollowed Out
In the mid-’80s, President Ronald Reagan and his Democratic ally, then-Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Joe Biden (D-Del.), joined forces to implement draconian drug penalties, including mandatory minimum sentences and penalties for crack that were famously much harsher than those for powdered cocaine. The total U.S. prison population surged from 330,000 inmates in 1980 to 1.57 million in 2012, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics — making the American prison population the largest in the world.
(Read Full Text) (Photo Credit: Unlisted)

america-wakiewakie:

Here’s How The U.S. Sparked A Refugee Crisis On The Border, In 8 Simple Steps | Huffington Post

The 57,000 children from Central America who have streamed across the U.S.-Mexico border this year were driven in large part by the United States itself. While Democrats and Republicans have been pointing fingers at each other, in reality the current wave of migration from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras has its roots in six decades of U.S. policies carried out by members of both parties.

Since the 1950s, the U.S. has sown violence and instability in Central America. Decades of Cold War gamesmanship, together with the relentless global war on drugs, have left a legacy of chaos and brutality in these countries. In many parts of the region, civil society has given way to lawlessness. It’s these conditions the children are escaping.

1) 1954: US Overthrows Arbenz

The story of the U.S.-led destabilization of Central America began in 1954, with the overthrow of the elected Guatemalan government of President Jacobo Arbenz. A populist leader inspired by President Franklin Roosevelt’s “New Deal,” Arbenz had plans for an ambitious land redistribution program that aimed to help a nation composed largely of landless farmers. 

But those plans butted against the interests of the United Fruit Company, a U.S. corporation that owned much of Guatemala’s arable land, along with railroad infrastructure and a port. The CIA helped engineer the overthrow of the Arbenz government, laying the foundation for decades of government instability and, eventually, a civil war that would claim more than 200,000 lives by the 1980s. That war wasn’t fully resolved until the 1990s. 

“Our involvement in Central America has not been a very positive one over the last 60 years,” Rep. Beto O’Rourke, a Democrat from El Paso, Texas, told The Huffington Post. “You can go back to the coup that overthrew Jacobo Arbenz in 1954, fully backed by the Eisenhower administration and the Dulles brothers, who had an interest in the United Fruit company, whose fight with the government really precipitated the crisis that led to the coup.” 

It set a pattern. “You look at the decades following that, and the military strongmen, and the juntas, and the mass killings, and it’s no wonder Guatemala is in such terrible shape today,” O’Rourke said.

2) U.S. Fuels Civil Wars

Along with the decades-long war against leftists in Guatemala, the U.S. organized and funded El Salvador’s protracted war with the FMLN, a left-wing guerrilla movement. The U.S. also funded counterinsurgency efforts in Honduras, which became a staging ground for the Contras. Death squads flourished, more than75,000 people died and civil society collapsed. 

If today’s crisis were simply a result of Central American confusion about the president’s policy regarding immigrant children, as is widely alleged, one might expect children to be coming in equal numbers from every Central American country. But notably, Nicaragua — a country that borders Honduras, and one in which the U.S. failed to keep a far-left government from coming to power — is today relatively stable and not a source of rampant migration. It is led by President Daniel Ortega, whose Sandinista movement took power in 1979 and held off the U.S.-backed Contras until an opposition government was elected in 1990. 

"You see the direct effects of these Cold War policies," Greg Grandin, a professor of Latin American history at New York University, told The Huffington Post. "Nicaragua doesn’t really have a gang problem, and researchers have traced this back to the 1980s and U.S. Cold War policy." 

3) Refugees Flee Central America For The U.S.

With wars come refugees. The young people who streamed into the United States from Central America in the late ’70s and ’80s had deep experience with violence. When Alex Sanchez, the executive director of Homies Unidos in Los Angeles, made his first journey from El Salvador to the United States in 1979, he was only 7 years old. Like many of the 57,000 children stopped at the U.S.-Mexico border in 2014 — most of them from Central America — Sanchez came to the U.S. searching for his parents, who had immigrated to Los Angeles five years before. When the adults he was traveling with handed him and his 5-year-old brother to their parents in L.A., Sanchez no longer recognized them. 

“All I had was a black-and-white picture of my mother from when she was 16,” Sanchez told The Huffington Post. “These two people were complete strangers to us now. We didn’t know them anymore. We thought initially that we had been sold, given to strangers — we didn’t know what to make of it.”

4) The U.S. Launches The Drug War As Cities Are Hollowed Out

In the mid-’80s, President Ronald Reagan and his Democratic ally, then-Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Joe Biden (D-Del.), joined forces to implement draconian drug penalties, including mandatory minimum sentences and penalties for crack that were famously much harsher than those for powdered cocaine. The total U.S. prison population surged from 330,000 inmates in 1980 to 1.57 million in 2012, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics — making the American prison population the largest in the world.

(Read Full Text) (Photo Credit: Unlisted)

(via everythingsbetterwithbisexuals)